lim joe→∞

Teaching, Mathematics and Teaching Math.

What sort of gamer are you? (Research Paper)

Posted by forumjoe on August 13, 2009

From a Slashdot article I found a research paper that I find interesting enough to be my first Gaming post on this blog. (I’m more interested in gaming research that mainstream gaming news, so must of the stuff I post here will be research related)

Player Modeling using Self-Organization in Tomb Raider: Underworld (Anders Drachen, Alessandro Canossa and Georgios N. Yannakakis, 2009)

Using statistics about player deaths, game completion time, and the number of times (and places) a player asked for help, the researchers were able to categorise players into four different categories:

  • Veterans
  • Solvers
  • Pacifists
  • Runners

Obviously these four categories are specifically related to Tomb Raider: Underworld, and aren’t necessarily directly transferrable to different types of games.  But if you consider TR:U to be the tool for gathering statistics, rather than the entire focus of the study, you can still get a lot out of it.  There are plenty of other online quizzes and stuff (usually related to MMOs) that determine the sort of gamer that you are, but this paper is the first I’ve read that uses solid data analysis to create the categories, rather than just asking questions about what the player enjoys and aims for.

Myself?  It’s been a long time since I played a Tomb Raider game (though I have been intending to check out one of the newer ones recently).  I generally didn’t like the combat (though was still able to do it) because I came from a FPS background.  If I want combat, I’ll play quake, I played Tomb-Raider for the adventure and the puzzles.  It appealed to my Prince of Persia mindset.  I guess that puts me in the Solver category, but really I could be a veteran or a pacifist too.  Who knows?

It’s an interesting paper.  Check it out.

Addendum: I’ve been shown http://www.mud.co.uk/richard/hcds.htm which talks about similar stuff, only was written 15 years ago and uses MUDs as its statistical tool.  Quite Interesting. (Richard Bartle, 1995)

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